Monday, February 15, 2010

Still on Track

Good visit with Rifkin today. Everything is a go for Houston. He is very pleased with my recovery, and probably a bit surprised, as I was quite compromised when I first arrived back from Little Rock. The bone marrow still doesn't work quite right, but I'll leave that problem to Mike's cells. IGGs are at 1875 (normal being 600 to 1600). M spike is stable at 1.4. White count is a bit low at 2.2 but he is unconcerned about that. One more visit with him next Monday, then we're off to M.D. Anderson.

5 comments:

Sandy said...

Good news and I will join the cheering squad that intends from a distance that all continues to proceed well and successfully for you in this next step toward your recovery...

sigun said...

Joe and I will be with you in our thoughts and prayers in Houston. Bises, Sigun.

tim's wife said...

Hi Dan,
I know you're all getting ready now to go to the "big T". Thinking of you and wishing all the best to you and your family.
Denise from snowy NJ

John C said...

I have a comment on the Dan Patterson.

We had an impossible case. Stupid people with a stupid position. You could read how stupid we were daily in the newspaper. After firing 3 law firms, we were finally able to convince Dan to take the case (on the second try, I might add).

He had to make some very hard decisions what to let go of, what to keep. Defendants, causes of actions the whole bag. And, of course to convince us, the clients to go along. I pushed him all the time, what about this, what about that. It was really a strategy to keep him focused and on top of our case. And he was.

We let go of some real evil actors to concentrate the case, it was hard but you either put your faith in Dan or you went with someone else.

But Dan was our guy. The jury selection was a low point: How could the plaintiffs complain, they got what you would expect, what is the problem?

But, but, Dan turned it around. He sliced and diced the defendants with every witness and showed that it was just all about a business decision that traded safety for cash. What a risk he took. If I or Dolly collapsed on the stand, or he had taken the wrong approach, we would have been washed out.

At the closing arguments, Dan gave his, the defendants responded. During the arguments, the courtroom started to fill up with reporters and spectators. The spectators included a class of high school students. After the defendants response, the students filed out. At that point Dan turns to me and says “They are leaving at the wrong time.” How true. If they had only stayed for his rebuttal. It was brilliant.

We went into a private room after the jury took it under advisement and I said “No one could have done better.” I am an attorney and know what that means and wanted him to know as well, right then before the verdict.

The jury agreed with Dan, the trial court agreed and ultimately, the appeals court.

This was a vicious legal knife fight with sudden death if we lost. In these circumstance, you wanted Dan at your back and I and my family will be forever grateful that he took our case.

By the way, I understand the industry has now adopted the safety standards Dan argued.

John C. Dean

John C said...

I have a comment on the Dan Patterson.

We had an impossible case. Stupid people with a stupid position. You could read how stupid we were daily in the newspaper. After firing 3 law firms, we were finally able to convince Dan to take the case (on the second try, I might add).

He had to make some very hard decisions what to let go of, what to keep. Defendants, causes of actions the whole bag. And, of course to convince us, the clients to go along. I pushed him all the time, what about this, what about that. It was really a strategy to keep him focused and on top of our case. And he was.

We let go of some real evil actors to concentrate the case, it was hard but you either put your faith in Dan or you went with someone else.

But Dan was our guy. The jury selection was a low point: How could the plaintiffs complain, they got what you would expect, what is the problem?

But, but, Dan turned it around. He sliced and diced the defendants with every witness and showed that it was just all about a business decision that traded safety for cash. What a risk he took. If I or Dolly collapsed on the stand, or he had taken the wrong approach, we would have been washed out.

At the closing arguments, Dan gave his, the defendants responded. During the arguments, the courtroom started to fill up with reporters and spectators. The spectators included a class of high school students. After the defendants response, the students filed out. At that point Dan turns to me and says “They are leaving at the wrong time.” How true. If they had only stayed for his rebuttal. It was brilliant.

We went into a private room after the jury took it under advisement and I said “No one could have done better.” I am an attorney and know what that means and wanted him to know as well, right then before the verdict.

The jury agreed with Dan, the trial court agreed and ultimately, the appeals court.

This was a vicious legal knife fight with sudden death if we lost. In these circumstance, you wanted Dan at your back and I and my family will be forever grateful that he took our case.

By the way, I understand the industry has now adopted the safety standards Dan argued.

John C. Dean